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Top trends nutrition


Top trends in nutrition 

What’s hot, and what’s not?

Manufacturers and producers try to stay a step ahead of new, all-important consumer trends. So, what’s hot for 2019? Read on and see what experts predict as top trends for our food, diet and nutrition.

Fibre, a simple food in the top trends

Research shows that in the UK, fibre-rich food intake has gone up by 33% across the population. As we learn more about the benefits of fibre, its popularity rises. From gut health to weight management, and even mental health, keep your eyes on this food group. In addition to fibre, pre- and probiotics will play a key role in our health, nutrition and foods this year.

Techno food and nutrition trends

Can we expect the rise of “personalised nutrition” to boom in the next few years? In 2019, we see lots of start-up firms expanding in this field. We are already very familiar with wearable apps and tech tools that let us measure activity levels, heart rate, calorie intake and more. Now we seem ready to let companies tailor our diets based on our DNA. Whether this is affordable for each person remains to be seen. Furthermore, there is clear evidence that it’s not just our DNA that predicts health or illness…our environments play a huge role too, be that clean air or too much stress. Because of that, this is an area to watch and the future will tell if this is a viable solution to optimal health.

Pre-, pro- and post-biotics: nutrition trends to watch

Pre-and probiotics experienced a surge of exiting new applications in the past year, and this will continue. The more we learn about the ‘microbiome’ the more uses we find for ‘biotic substances’. First, we decoded the human genome, or the genes we are born with. Now, we know that the bacteria that live in out body have their own genes and  ‘genome’, the so-called microbiome. Bacterial genetics can have a huge impact on our inborn genetics. Manipulating the microbiome and creating ‘post-biotics’ is the latest trend, with interesting outcomes so far. Eventually, targeted foods or nutrition supplements may help overcome bad bacteria such as Salmonella.

Vegan nutrition trends

Vegan is hot! Australian data on veganism is sketchy but show a rapid increase overall. So far, even fast-food chains are offering vegan burgers, topped with vegan cheese. Anything to stay on trend! The latest UK data shows a 600% increase in veganism over four years, with 84% being females. As a result, large supermarkets are gearing up with ever-expanding lines of animal-free nutrition products. We see the rise of plant-based protein sources. From rice/pea/hemp protein powders to pulse pasta, we can now get a great variety of protein, based on plant ingredients only.

Keto vs Paleo diet: trends compared

The Keto diet shows a popularity that keeps increasing, whereas the Paleo diet is on the decline, according to Google statistical search data. Keto diets, or low-carb, high fat, are not suitable for everyone, but remain a very popular way to manage weight. Carbs produce energy. By eating a low carb diet, the body turns to fat instead to produce energy. So-called Keto-bodies (alternative energy cells) are formed and help burn fat.  

Carbs and fats: facts


Carbs and fats are a constant source of confusion for consumers who find it hard to understand the differences between good and bad sugars or fats. The fear of carbs can cause problems in itself: nutrient deficiencies can arise without intention. Sadly, even body image distortion can drive the no carb/low carb hype.

Simply put: the sweet taste of a fresh carrot is from its natural sugars, the sweet taste of a soft-drink comes from added sugars. We need some forms of carbs each day.

Fats can be good but they way we treat them (such as heating) can destroy the benefits. Some fats are downright bad, such as in fried foods. Often, fats found in so-called ‘health’ products are not ideal. So, always read the label and look for trans fat and saturated fat content.

The Keto diet requires will-power, knowledge about nutrition, and suitable foods. In today’s busy life, stores are aiming to cash in on the Keto trend by a rapid development in Keto foods, snacks and drinks.

Whatever you decide, always consult with a health practitioner before you attempt a new diet.

Make the right choice, make an appointment now


What’s the big deal about protein?

Why is protein so important?  It’s a wickedly fascinating food source that breaks down in the stomach into amino acids. You could compare it to building with Lego blocks. You take the construction apart, mix up the colours and build something new. The same applies to protein, and hey presto, these blocks find new partners and rebuild into new amino acids. The body uses these new blocks to perform important functions. The most important of these is the building of new cells for growth or maintenance. Our bodies are made to survive, so this is a function that is ‘built in by nature’. Survival, friends, it’s all about survival, otherwise we wouldn’t have been around for so long. The second task for those new amino acid building blocks (if there are enough of them, that is) is to maintain your immune system. Now that you think about it, isn’t it always that when you are tired and run down, you end up with a cold, the flu or worse? Were you eating well in the lead-up? No, possibly not… We catch up with ourselves at such moments.

Once our cell renewal program and our immune system have had their share of our protein intake, we may have some building blocks left to boost our mood. The brain runs on (amino acid based) stuff like dopamine (for good moods) and serotonin (calming). If our protein intake is low, over extended times, we can become deficient. Some of the amino acids are not available and our mood drops. Sometimes, the feeling of depression or anxiety can partly be the result of a deficiency in protein over time. It can even occur in those that take extra protein into their daily intake. In that case it’s getting burnt up faster than it can be processed, and all the building blocks are going to cell repair and renewal. This can happen with extreme workout programs. Balance is a big part of the protein picture. Balance in the amount and quality. Balance in knowing what our needs are, and how they can change per life stage. Making sure that you have good quality protein as part of every meal is essential to keep all three important functions going. Renewal, immune function and mood shaping, that’s the order of nature, even if it leaves us unhappy. So make sure you never pass on protein; it’s a superb hunger filler. Now you know why:)


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